Listen to sermons at FreeGraceRadio.com

 

 

 

 

Sermon #102[i]— Romans Series`

 

Title:                           Sovereign Mercy

 

Text:                            Romans 9:6-18

Subject:                     The Sovereignty of God in Salvation

Introduction:

 

The title of my message is Sovereign Mercy.Sovereign Mercy — That is my subject. Let me begin by asking you a question.

 

Has the Lord God ever called you down into the dust before the throne of his sovereign mercy? Anyone who experiences the grace of God in salvation will be brought down in the dust of humiliation before the throne of his sovereign mercy. Before God exalts a man, he abases him. Before God clothes any sinner with the garments of Christ’s righteousness, he strips the sinner of the filthy rags of his own righteousness.

 

Zacchaeus

 

We see this clearly exemplified in the case of Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1-10). — “When Jesus came to the place, he looked up and saw him, and said unto him, Zacchaeus, make haste and come down; for today I must abide at thy house” (Luke 19:5). When God calls the sinner to Christ, he always says, “come down.

 

The way of salvation is a downward path. You must come down. God’s call is a humbling call. Today, the preacher calls sinners to Christ with a call that makes them proud, exalts them in their own esteem, and leads them to think, “I can come to God when I choose. I do not need the influence of God the Holy Spirit. It is not God’s call that is the thing that determines whether or not I shall be saved, but my own free-will.” Today, sinners are being called to go up, and not to come down. But God always humbles the sinner.

 

The first step you must take is downward. You must go down from your own good works. That is a gigantic step down, far too humbling for most; but it must be taken. Some stand upon their own self-sufficiency. But Christ says, “Come down.” You must come down from your own good works and come down from your own self-sufficiency. That is another great step downward; but it must be taken. Down, my friend, you must come down. Come down from all your hope in yourself and in what you do. Come down until you see that you are utterly without strength, until you are utterly lost, until you see that you are nothing and can do nothing. Come down until the waters of God’s wrath swell around you and you are made to see that you justly deserve to die. Come down until you are made to see your utter wickedness, vileness, corruption, and filthiness. When God means to save, he says, “Come down.”

 

Proud sinner, it is a foolish thing for you to be proud. You exalt yourself so very high. You think you are something. You are nothing, nothing but sin, vile, loathsome sin; from the soul of your foot to the crown of your head, you are sin. What do you have to be proud of? You must come down, down to the feet of Christ. The place of mercy is in the dust. Come down!

 

You will either come down now by the power of his grace, or you will come down in the day of his wrath by the power of his iron rod; but you will come down. He “hath cast down the mighty from their seat, and hath exalted the humble and the meek.”

 

Sovereign Mercy — That’s my subject. It is set before us most clearly in Holy Scripture. It is written as with a lightning bolt throughout the Book of God. In Hebrew 2:16, we read, “Verily he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham.” When our Lord Jesus Christ came to save fallen creatures, he passed by the fallen angels and laid hold upon the seed of Abraham. He did not take hold of the seed of Adam, but he took hold of the seed of Abraham, God’s elect, and delivered them from the bondage of death by the irresistible power of his grace.

 

We were lost, rushing headlong to destruction, until Christ reached down the hand of his sovereign mercy and omnipotent grace and delivered us. Every saved sinner is “a brand plucked from the burning” (Zechariah 3:2), snatched out of the jaws of hell, snatched out from among perishing men by sovereign mercy and irresistible grace. He passed by the fallen angels, passed by the sons of Adam, and took hold upon the seed of Abraham.

 

Proposition: God our Savior reserves the right of absolute sovereignty in the exercise of his saving grace and in the application of his mercy. As he is sovereign in creation and in providence, our God is absolutely sovereign in the exercise of his grace in the salvation of sinners.

 

Bible Doctrine

 

You cannot read through the Bible without being confronted with the fact of divine sovereignty on almost every page. Today we hear much talk about the “fundamentals of the faith.” Yet, those who boast of being “uncompromising fundamentalists” seldom ever mention the Gospel doctrine of divine sovereignty. When they do mention it, it is only to denounce it and poke fun at those who believe it.

 

Let men hoot and holler as they please. Let men, if they dare, deny it, ridicule it, and rebel against it as they will. God’s indisputable sovereignty is a fundamental doctrine of Holy Scripture, a vital point of Christian theology.

 

If you doubt the prevalence and importance of this doctrine of God’s sovereignty in the exercise of his saving mercy, love, and grace, I challenge you to read the Word of God through one more time. Begin at the Book of Genesis and go right through the Book of Revelation. You will find the Gospel doctrine of divine sovereignty repeatedly declared, explained, and illustrated throughout the Sacred Volume. It is set forth, not in a few isolated verses, but upon every page of Inspiration. God has mercy on whom he will have mercy, and whom he will he hardeneth.“For he saith to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion. So then it is not of him that willeth, nor of him that runneth, but of God that showeth mercy” (Romans 9:15-16).

 

Satan and Adam

 

The illustrations of God’s sovereignty in the exercise of his grace are as numerous as the characters mentioned in the Bible.

 

Satan led a revolt in heaven against the throne of God. One third of the heavenly angels fell from their holy habitation. As a result of their sin, they were forever doomed to suffer the wrath of God. No mercy was extended to them. No grace was offered to them. No savior was sent to deliver them. The fallen angels were forever damned without the least measure of grace.

 

Then Adam did the same thing. He sinned against the throne of God. He challenged God’s right to be God. What happened? God was gracious. God promised the fallen sons of Adam a Savior, a Redeemer, a Way of mercy (Genesis 3:15). The angels who sinned were passed by, reprobate, without mercy. Yet, when Adam did the same thing, God extended mercy to fallen man. That is divine sovereignty!

 

Why did God pass by the angels that fell? Why did God extend mercy to fallen men? Only one answer can be given, — “He hath mercy on whom he will have mercy, and whom he will he hardeneth” (Romans 9:18).

 

You can either rebel against this message of divine sovereignty and perish in your rebellion, or you can bow to the sovereign God and say with Christ, “Even so, Father, for so it seemed good in thy sight” (Matthew 11:26). Whether you bow to God’s throne or rebel against it, the fact remains the same. The God of the Bible is an absolute sovereign. He can save you, or he can damn you. That is his right as God. It is entirely up to him.

 

Old Testatment Examples

 

As God chose some angels who lost not their first estate, and passed by others; even so, among the fallen sons of Adam there are some who are chosen of God, to whom he will be gracious, and there are some whom God has passed by, to whom no grace is given.

Š      Adam had two sons, Cain and Abel. God passed by Cain, the older, and saved Abel his brother.

Š      Abraham had two sons, Ishmael and Isaac. God passed by Ishmael and saved Isaac.

Š      Isaac had two sons, Esau and Jacob. God passed by Esau because he hated Esau, and saved Jacob because he loved Jacob.

Š      In the days of Noah, God destroyed the entire human race, except for one man and his family. Why did God save Noah? Because — “Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord” (Genesis 6:8).

Š      Pharaoh — Throughout the Old Testament we are given example after example of God’s sovereignty in salvation. One glaring example of God’s sovereignty is Pharaoh. God raised him up for no other purpose but to harden his heart and dump him and the entire Egyptian army in the Red Sea, so that his sovereign power might be declared throughout the world (Romans 9:17).

 

New Testament Examples

 

Perhaps you think, “All that was in the Old Testament. God is different now.” Do not be so foolish. The God of the Old Testament is the God of the New Testament, too. He never changes (Malachi 3:6; Hebrews 13:8). His glorious sovereignty is just as clearly exemplified and even more fully revealed in the New Testament.

Š      When our Lord passed by gathering his disciples, he called Simon and Andrew, but not their father.

Š      He chose James and John, but not Zebedee.

Š      He healed some, and left others to die.

Š      He called some, and passed others by.

Š      He saved some who sought him (The Woman with an Issue of Blood), and he did not save others who sought him (The Rich Young Ruler).

Š      The Lord Jesus prayed for some, and refused to pray for others (John 17:9, 20).

Š      Christ died for some, but did not die for others (John 10:11, 26).

Š      He was gracious to some, but not to others. This is a fact: — God does not deal with all people alike.

 

The New Testament plainly and forcibly teaches the Gospel doctrine of God’s absolute sovereignty in the exercise of his grace (Matthew 11:20-27; John 12:36-41; Romans 11:5-11, 32-36).

 

(Matthew 11:20-27) “Then began he to upbraid the cities wherein most of his mighty works were done, because they repented not: (21) Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works, which were done in you, had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes. (22) But I say unto you, It shall be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon at the day of judgment, than for you. (23) And thou, Capernaum, which art exalted unto heaven, shalt be brought down to hell: for if the mighty works, which have been done in thee, had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day. (24) But I say unto you, That it shall be more tolerable for the land of Sodom in the day of judgment, than for thee. (25) At that time Jesus answered and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes. (26) Even so, Father: for so it seemed good in thy sight. (27) All things are delivered unto me of my Father: and no man knoweth the Son, but the Father; neither knoweth any man the Father, save the Son, and he to whomsoever the Son will reveal him.”

 

(John 12:36-41) “While ye have light, believe in the light, that ye may be the children of light. These things spake Jesus, and departed, and did hide himself from them. (37) But though he had done so many miracles before them, yet they believed not on him: (38) That the saying of Esaias the prophet might be fulfilled, which he spake, Lord, who hath believed our report? and to whom hath the arm of the Lord been revealed? (39) Therefore they could not believe, because that Esaias said again, (40) He hath blinded their eyes, and hardened their heart; that they should not see with their eyes, nor understand with their heart, and be converted, and I should heal them. (41) These things said Esaias, when he saw his glory, and spake of him.

 

(Romans 11:5-11) “Even so then at this present time also there is a remnant according to the election of grace. (6) And if by grace, then is it no more of works: otherwise grace is no more grace. But if it be of works, then is it no more grace: otherwise work is no more work. (7) What then? Israel hath not obtained that which he seeketh for; but the election hath obtained it, and the rest were blinded (8) (According as it is written, God hath given them the spirit of slumber, eyes that they should not see, and ears that they should not hear;) unto this day. (9) And David saith, Let their table be made a snare, and a trap, and a stumblingblock, and a recompense unto them: (10) Let their eyes be darkened that they may not see, and bow down their back alway. (11) I say then, Have they stumbled that they should fall? God forbid: but rather through their fall salvation is come unto the Gentiles, for to provoke them to jealousy.”

 

(Romans 11:32-36) “For God hath concluded them all in unbelief, that he might have mercy upon all. (33) O the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! how unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past finding out! (34) For who hath known the mind of the Lord? or who hath been his counsellor? (35) Or who hath first given to him, and it shall be recompensed unto him again? (36) For of him, and through him, and to him, are all things: to whom be glory forever. Amen.”

 

This one thing we must see: The God of glory is absolutely sovereign in salvation. He wounds; and he heals. He kills; and he makes alive. It is his sovereign right to either save me or damn me, to either be gracious to me, or to pass me by.

 

Rebels would be wise to fall down before his sovereign throne, and beg for mercy. Like the Leper, fall down at his feet and say, — “If thou wilt, thou canst make me clean” (Mark 1:40). Will you perish in your proud rebellion; or will you take your place in the dust and beg for mercy?

 

“Pass me not, O gentle Savior,

Hear my humble cry:

While on others Thou art calling,

Do not, do not pass me by!”

 

Vital Doctrine

 

I tell you without hesitation that this Gospel doctrine of divine sovereignty is vital. You will either bow to God’s righteous sovereignty, or you will perish in your rebellion.

 

C. H. Spurgeon said this: — “If you in your heart hate the doctrine that God has a right to save or to destroy you, you give me very grave cause to suspect whether you know your own position in the sight of God; for I am quite sure that no humble sinner will doubt God’s right to destroy him….I tell you, it is your unhumbled pride that kicks against these doctrines; it is your infernal self-conceit, born of hell, that makes you hate this truth. Men have always kicked at it, and they always will. When Christ preached it once, they would have dragged him out to the brow of the hill, and cast him down head long; and I expect always to meet with opposition, if I speak out broadly and plainly; but let me tell you solemnly, if you do not believe God’s right over you, I am afraid your heart has never been right before God.”

 

I am here to lift high the glorious banner of God’s absolute sovereignty. I am calling for proud worms to bow down before God’s sovereign throne. I am, in the name of God, calling for you to lay down your weapons of rebellion and surrender to God our Savior in his total sovereignty. — “Be ye reconciled to God!

 

You have two choices: Either surrender to Christ’s sovereign dominion, or be crushed into hell for your rebellion. Men rail at me for preaching the sovereignty of God’s grace as I do. They angrily denounce me as a Hardshell, an Antinomian, and a Hyper-Calvinist. I care nothing about that. I am happy to make them angry. If a man hates the truth of God, I shall never be backward about stirring up his wrath. If a man is offended by the character of God, I shall be delighted to offend him (Isaiah 45:5-10, 20-25; 43:1-13).

 

Illustration: “Give the goats sore gums.”

 — Vern Barrett

 

(Isaiah 45:5-10) “I am the LORD, and there is none else, there is no God beside me: I girded thee, though thou hast not known me: (6) That they may know from the rising of the sun, and from the west, that there is none beside me. I am the LORD, and there is none else. (7) I form the light, and create darkness: I make peace, and create evil: I the LORD do all these things. (8) Drop down, ye heavens, from above, and let the skies pour down righteousness: let the earth open, and let them bring forth salvation, and let righteousness spring up together; I the LORD have created it. (9) Woe unto him that striveth with his Maker! Let the potsherd strive with the potsherds of the earth. Shall the clay say to him that fashioneth it, What makest thou? or thy work, He hath no hands? (10) Woe unto him that saith unto his father, What begettest thou? or to the woman, What hast thou brought forth?

 

(Isaiah 45:20-25) “Assemble yourselves and come; draw near together, ye that are escaped of the nations: they have no knowledge that set up the wood of their graven image, and pray unto a god that cannot save. (21) Tell ye, and bring them near; yea, let them take counsel together: who hath declared this from ancient time? Who hath told it from that time? Have not I the LORD? And there is no God else beside me; a just God and a Saviour; there is none beside me. (22) Look unto me, and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth: for I am God, and there is none else. (23) I have sworn by myself, the word is gone out of my mouth in righteousness, and shall not return, That unto me every knee shall bow, every tongue shall swear. (24) Surely, shall one say, in the LORD have I righteousness and strength: even to him shall men come; and all that are incensed against him shall be ashamed. (25) In the LORD shall all the seed of Israel be justified, and shall glory.”

 

(Isaiah 43:1-13) “But now thus saith the LORD that created thee, O Jacob, and he that formed thee, O Israel, Fear not: for I have redeemed thee, I have called thee by thy name; thou art mine. (2) When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee: when thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned; neither shall the flame kindle upon thee. (3) For I am the LORD thy God, the Holy One of Israel, thy Saviour: I gave Egypt for thy ransom, Ethiopia and Seba for thee. (4) Since thou wast precious in my sight, thou hast been honourable, and I have loved thee: therefore will I give men for thee, and people for thy life. (5) Fear not: for I am with thee: I will bring thy seed from the east, and gather thee from the west; (6) I will say to the north, Give up; and to the south, Keep not back: bring my sons from far, and my daughters from the ends of the earth; (7) Even every one that is called by my name: for I have created him for my glory, I have formed him; yea, I have made him. (8) Bring forth the blind people that have eyes, and the deaf that have ears. (9) Let all the nations be gathered together, and let the people be assembled: who among them can declare this, and show us former things? let them bring forth their witnesses, that they may be justified: or let them hear, and say, It is truth. (10) Ye are my witnesses, saith the LORD, and my servant whom I have chosen: that ye may know and believe me, and understand that I am he: before me there was no God formed, neither shall there be after me. (11) I, even I, am the LORD; and beside me there is no saviour. (12) I have declared, and have saved, and I have showed, when there was no strange god among you: therefore ye are my witnesses, saith the LORD, that I am God. (13) Yea, before the day was I am he; and there is none that can deliver out of my hand: I will work, and who shall let it?”

 

Romans 9

 

Now, turn to the 9th chapter of the book of Romans (Romans 9:6-18), and let me show you five examples of God’s great sovereign mercy set before us in this chapter, five examples of our God’s glorious sovereignty in the exercise of his mercy — Romans 9:6-8.

  • Ishmael
  • Isaac
  • Jacob
  • Esau
  • Pharaoh

 

(Romans 9:6-18) “Not as though the word of God hath taken none effect. For they are not all Israel, which are of Israel: (7) Neither, because they are the seed of Abraham, are they all children: but, In Isaac shall thy seed be called. (8) That is, They which are the children of the flesh, these are not the children of God: but the children of the promise are counted for the seed. (9) For this is the word of promise, At this time will I come, and Sara shall have a son. (10) And not only this; but when Rebecca also had conceived by one, even by our father Isaac; (11) (For the children being not yet born, neither having done any good or evil, that the purpose of God according to election might stand, not of works, but of him that calleth;) (12) It was said unto her, The elder shall serve the younger. (13) As it is written, Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated. (14) What shall we say then? Is there unrighteousness with God? God forbid. (15) For he saith to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion. (16) So then it is not of him that willeth, nor of him that runneth, but of God that sheweth mercy. (17) For the Scripture saith unto Pharaoh, Even for this same purpose have I raised thee up, that I might shew my power in thee, and that my name might be declared throughout all the earth. (18) Therefore hath he mercy on whom he will have mercy, and whom he will he hardeneth.”

 

Ishmael and Isaac

 

1stThe Apostle Paul was inspired of God the Holy Ghost to show us God’s sovereignty in the exercise of his mercy in the way he dealt with Ishmael and Isaac.

 

(Romans 9:6-9) “Not as though the word of God hath taken none effect. For they are not all Israel, which are of Israel: (7) Neither, because they are the seed of Abraham, are they all children: but, In Isaac shall thy seed be called. (8) That is, They which are the children of the flesh, these are not the children of God: but the children of the promise are counted for the seed. (9) For this is the word of promise, At this time will I come, and Sara shall have a son.”

 

Abraham’s two sons, Ishmael and Isaac. They are held before us as an allegory, a spiritual picture or illustration of the everlasting distinction of God’s elect from the reprobate of this world (Galatians 4:22-24).

 

(Galatians 4:22-24) “For it is written, that Abraham had two sons, the one by a bondmaid, the other by a freewoman. (23) But he who was of the bondwoman was born after the flesh; but he of the freewoman was by promise. (24) Which things are an allegory: for these are the two covenants; the one from the mount Sinai, which gendereth to bondage, which is Agar.”

 

The birth of Isaac was by promise. Without a miracle, it would never have taken place. Isaac portray salvation by the miracle of grace. The birth of Ishmael was not by promise but in the ordinary course of nature, portraying man’s efforts to save himself by works.

  • Ishmael was a product of human effort.
  • Isaac was the product of divine intervention.
  • Ishmael was a child bondage.
  • Isaac was a child of liberty.
  • Ishmael was cast out of the house.
  • Isaac was the heir of grace (Galatians 4:28).

 

(Galatians 4:28) Now we, brethren, as Isaac was, are the children of promise.”

 

(John 3:5-8) “Jesus answered, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God. (6) That which is born of the flesh is flesh; and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit. (7) Marvel not that I said unto thee, Ye must be born again. (8) The wind bloweth where it listeth, and thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh, and whither it goeth: so is every one that is born of the Spirit.

 

(Philippians 3:3) “For we are the circumcision, which worship God in the spirit, and rejoice in Christ Jesus, and have no confidence in the flesh.)

 

Jacob and Esau

 

2ndIn verses 10-13, the Holy Spirit inspired the Apostle to use Jacob and Esau as examples to teach us something of the glory of God in the exercise of his electing love.

 

(Romans 9:10-13) “And not only this; but when Rebecca also had conceived by one, even by our father Isaac; (11) (For the children being not yet born, neither having done any good or evil, that the purpose of God according to election might stand, not of works, but of him that calleth;) (12) It was said unto her, The elder shall serve the younger. (13) As it is written, Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated.”

 

Jacob and Esau were conceived at the same time and born at the same time, had the same mother and father; and before they were ever born the Lord God said to their mother, Rebecca, “the elder shall serve the younger.” And he gave this reason: “Jacob have I loved, but Esau have I hated.” And this was done before either had done anything good or evil, “that the purpose of God according to election might stand, not of works, but of him that calleth.

 

The great distinction made between these two brothers can only be traced to one thing: the sovereign will of God (Exodus 33:18-19).

 

(Exodus 33:18-19) “And he said, I beseech thee, shew me thy glory. (19) And he said, I will make all my goodness pass before thee, and I will proclaim the name of the LORD before thee; and will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will shew mercy on whom I will shew mercy.”

 

God’s choice of Jacob as the object of his love was made before the children were born (2 Thessalonians 2:13). The choice was made before he had done anything, good or evil (Titus 3:5). And the Lord’s choice of Jacob was made according to the purpose of God (Romans 8:28; Ephesians 1:11; 2 Timothy 1:9). — The foundation and source of all mercy, love, and grace is   the sovereign will of God (Ephesians 1:3-5).

 

Bro. Henry Mahan wrote, “There was only one point in which the sons of Isaac were different. Esau was the oldest and (according to the flesh and natural custom) had priority and power over Jacob. But God chose the younger son to receive his mercy and partake of his grace (1 Corinthians 1:26-29).”

 

(1 Corinthians 1:26-29) “For ye see your calling, brethren, how that not many wise men after the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble, are called: (27) But God hath chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise; and God hath chosen the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty; (28) And base things of the world, and things which are despised, hath God chosen, yea, and things which are not, to bring to nought things that are: (29) That no flesh should glory in his presence.”

 

All this distinction flowed from God’s eternal love for Jacob and his eternal hatred of Esau. The great fundamental, Gospel doctrines of divine sovereignty, eternal election, absolute predestination, and everlasting reprobation are plainly stated in this portion of Holy Scripture.

 

  • God’s love for Jacob and his hatred of Esau were both by his own, sovereign determination (Malachi 1:2-3)

 

(Malachi 1:2-3) “I have loved you, saith the LORD. Yet ye say, Wherein hast thou loved us? Was not Esau Jacob’s brother? saith the LORD: yet I loved Jacob, (3) And I hated Esau, and laid his mountains and his heritage waste for the dragons of the wilderness.”

 

  • God left Esau to himself and dealt with him in justice. — Esau went to hell because he despised Christ. He preferred a mess of beans to the covenant birthright of God’s chosen. All Edomites, all the children of Esau go to hell or the same reason (John 3:36).

 

(John 3:36) “He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life: and he that believeth not the Son shall not see life; but the wrath of God abideth on him.”

 

  • Jacob was saved by God’s sovereign mercy, by the mercy, and truth, and justice of God in Christ. — All the sons of Jacob are saved the same way, for the same reason (Romans 3:24-28).

 

(Romans 3:24-28) “Being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus: (25) Whom God hath set forth to be a propitiation through faith in his blood, to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God; (26) To declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus. (27) Where is boasting then? It is excluded. By what law? of works? Nay: but by the law of faith. (28) Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith without the deeds of the law.”

 

Pharaoh

 

3rdIn verses 14-18, anticipating the objections of proud sinners to this great, blessed declaration of God’s goodness, grace, and glory in Christ, anticipating man’s objection to God’s sovereign mercy, Paul does not apologize for it, explain it, or defend it. Instead, he asserts his doctrine even more boldly and more dogmatically, reminding us of God’s revelation of his glory to Moses, using Pharaoh as an example of his sovereignty.

 

(Romans 9:14-18What shall we say then? Is there unrighteousness with God? God forbid. (15) For he saith to Moses, I will have mercy on whom I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion. (16) So then it is not of him that willeth, nor of him that runneth, but of God that sheweth mercy. (17) For the Scripture saith unto Pharaoh, Even for this same purpose have I raised thee up, that I might shew my power in thee, and that my name might be declared throughout all the earth. (18) Therefore hath he mercy on whom he will have mercy, and whom he will he hardeneth.”

 

Is there unrighteousness with God? God forbid! — Who dares charge God with folly! Whatever God does is right, whether you think so or not! Paul rests his doctrine on Scripture alone. He uses God’s own words to Moses to declare God’s sovereign mercy (Exodus 33:18-19).

 

(Exodus 33:18-19) “And he said, I beseech thee, shew me thy glory. (19) And he said, I will make all my goodness pass before thee, and I will proclaim the name of the LORD before thee; and will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will shew mercy on whom I will shew mercy.”

 

Application

 

God has spoken. This is enough. Bow, sinner, bow to the Throne of Grace! Bow down in the dust before the throne of God’s sovereign mercy, trusting Christ alone, or you will forever perish under his wrath in hell!

  • Salvation is not by your will, but God’s will (Romans 9:16).
  • Salvation is not by your works, but by God’s grace (Ephesians 2:8-9).
  • Salvation is to be had only by faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. — Oh, may God give you faith in him! — “Be ye reconciled to God!” — Sovereign mercy in the crucified Savior is the sinner’s only hope!

 

(2 Corinthians 5:17-6:27) “Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new. (18) And all things are of God, who hath reconciled us to himself by Jesus Christ, and hath given to us the ministry of reconciliation; (19) To wit, that God was in Christ, reconciling the world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses unto them; and hath committed unto us the word of reconciliation. (20) Now then we are ambassadors for Christ, as though God did beseech you by us: we pray you in Christ’s stead, be ye reconciled to God. (21) For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.

 

(6:1) We then, as workers together with him, beseech you also that ye receive not the grace of God in vain. (2) (For he saith, I have heard thee in a time accepted, and in the day of salvation have I succoured thee: behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation.)”

 

Amen.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Don Fortner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pastor Fortner’s

 

Audio Sermons

Video Sermons

Books

Itinerary

 

 

 



[i]    Danville — Sunday Morning — November 13, 2016

     Grace Baptist Church, Dingess, WV — (11/11/16)

 

Reading:    Exodus 33:12-34:9